Dribbble love
Tuesday, May 2nd, 2017

Dribbble love

For whatever reason there seems to be a lot of hate for Dribbble. Much of this is to do with, the perceived, inane comments  and the lack of any real constructive criticism. Dribbble is about the gloss, the bells and whistles and generally flexing your aesthetic muscle.

Didn’t mention the colours once

I was a long time lurker and used it as a source of inspiration. There’s other places to go for inspiration but what I like about Dribbble is the fact that it’s always a visual snippet that’s often out of context. There’s no bigger picture, just a small 800 x 600 one that you have to judge on its visual merits alone. If you want a quick vox pox on a tricky UX problem then this ain’t the place for you.

Great colours man

Not a day passes without someone on Designer News uttering the following about Dribbble – ‘great colours man’. I get it, as mentioned before, it’s not the best platform for constructive feedback but as a litmus test it’s unrivalled.

Post up an image and watch those likes, or lack of, to judge whether something works. If a shot gets a like per 10 views, I would judge that as a success. You might even get a comment.

The community is selective but not mean spirited and there’s a positive attitude amongst those posting work and those commenting. Generally it’s a nice place to be.

I wasn’t particularly rude or mean, I just pointed out some flaws but also acknowledged my own limitations of not understanding the project as a whole and only seeing a snippet out of context

Take it on the chin

As designers we have to be fairly resilient to feedback. Regardless of the data and evidence you work with and interpret the one thing you can’t account for is opinion. It’s part of the job and knowing how to take valid criticism is a sign of balance and maturity.

Literally no comment

My only bad experience with Dribbble was with a comment I made. I wasn’t particularly rude or mean, I just pointed out some flaws but also acknowledged my own limitations of not understanding the project as a whole and only seeing a snippet out of context. This was the opportunity to start a discussion and from here it got a bit weird.

The shot got taken down along with my comment, then ten minutes later the same work was re-posted. I took exception to this and made another comment pointing out that removing my original criticism didn’t fix the problem. Minutes later the shot was removed and then re-posted again. Then they disappeared from my feed and I was blocked from following them.

No comment

Whilst I should of shown some restraint it did demonstrate that Dribbble’s not all about the ‘great colours man’. Like in real life you can often stumble into awkward situations and like real life you stumble across people that refuse to discuss.